What You Like Doesn’t MatterSo I’m sitting around with a bunch of friends, and we’re discussing really important stuff, when somehow the subject of potato chips comes up. (Possibly because we were eating them.)

Within a few seconds, our friendly discussion morphed into a heated debate on the merits of regular potato chips versus “Kettle-Cooked” potato chips. Both sides vehemently defended their position regarding taste, texture, and mouth-feel. And neither side could fathom how the other could possibly prefer the obviously inferior option.

I sat watching quietly because I didn’t have a dog in this fight. (I like both kinds. Preferably flavored.) And I marveled at how something so mundane could stir such passion in people.

Because we take our likes and dislikes for granted. If we like something, it must be good. And if we dislike something, it must be bad..

But our tastes are just that: ours. They’re personal. They’re not objective.

Your prospects may have very different tastes than you. Their tastes aren’t wrong—they’re just different. And your prospects probably feel as passionately about their tastes as you do about yours. Which means you need to respect their tastes, even if you don’t understand them. Because in sales, it’s your prospect’s tastes that matter, not yours.

And the same goes for many other things your potential buyer has that may be radically different than yours, including their:

• Values
• Priorities
• Budget
• Dreams
• Fears
• Buying approach
• Beliefs
• Past experiences
• Idiosyncrasies
• Skepticism
• Risk tolerance
• Parenting style
• Self-Confidence
• Biases

All of these items are subjective. There’s no right or wrong. So don’t judge or dismiss people who think and feel differently than you do.

Instead, make an effort to empathize and understand. And even if you can’t fully understand someone’s thoughts or feelings, you can still respect them. And you must, because their thoughts and feelings are what will determine whether or not they buy from you.

So if you want to boost your sales, recognize that your prospect’s likes and dislikes are just as valid as—and even more important than—yours, and treat them accordingly.

Damn. Now I really want potato chips.

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