39 Ways to Make Your Business More Kid-Friendly

August 21st, 2018

39 Ways to Make Your Business More Kid-FriendlyHow kid-friendly are you? Whether you’re marketing to children or their parents, the more hospitable your business is to children, the more sales you’ll make.

For example, you might create a supervised play area where parents can leave their children while they shop. Consider putting small chairs in your waiting room so young kids don’t feel so uncomfortable. And be sure to place items you do want kids to see and touch down low to make it convenient for them.

Here are 36 other ideas for catering to kids and their parents:

1. Coloring books and crayons
2. A television with kid-appropriate programming
3. Blocks
4. Animals: fish, birds, hamsters, spiders, etc.
5. Children’s books
6. Magazines for a variety of ages
7. Candy or gumball machines
8. Model trains
9. Booster seats or high-chairs
10. Music
11. Puzzles
12. Games
13. Organized activities
14. Computers or tablets with kid-oriented software
15. Water, soda, or juice
16. Diaper changing tables in BOTH restrooms
17. Extra diapers and changing accessories
18. Puppets
19. Collector cards
20. Workshops exclusively for kids
21. Cartoons
22. A sandbox
23. Video games
24. Comic books
25. Popcorn
26. Child-sized or toy versions of your products or accessories
27. Temporary tattoos
28. Stuffed animals
29. Child-size food portions
30. Ice cream
31. Costumes and dress-up clothes
32. Balloons
33. A clown
34. Contests exclusively for kids
35. Face-painting
36. A treasure chest

Whichever ideas you choose to use, keep in mind that the most important factor when dealing with children is to have a kid-friendly attitude. Everyone in your organization should always treat them with kindness, courtesy, and respect.

After all, they’re your future customers.

What else have you done—or seen done—to make a business more friendly to kids? Share your experiences in the comments below!

Are You Treating Your Salespeople Too Well?

August 14th, 2018

Are You Treating Your Salespeople Too Well?If you saw that title and clicked over here to see if you might be treating your salespeople too well, I can guarantee you—you aren’t. In fact, you probably don’t treat your salespeople well enough.

Your salespeople are among the most important employees in your company. If money is the life blood of a business, salespeople are the heart that pumps it. Which means you need to take very good care of yours. (Both salespeople and heart.)

This is not to say that you need to give your sales team an unlimited budget and every conceivable perk. Nor does it mean that you shouldn’t hold your salespeople accountable. (You absolutely should.)

It means that whether you’re a sales manager, VP, or CEO, a big part of your job is to equip your sales team for success, eliminate as many hurdles for them as possible, create a positive atmosphere for them to work, provide them with plenty of feedback, coaching, and training, and shower them with appreciation.

Too many companies expect extraordinary results from their sales teams, but make it difficult for them to achieve such results. And then don’t reward their salespeople even when they do. This saps motivation, leading to poor performance, burnout, and lost sales.

The success of your business depends on your salespeople. The better you treat them, the better they’ll perform. Conversely, if you don’t treat your salespeople well enough, one of your competitors will.

Five Reasons Your Prospecting Sucks

August 7th, 2018

Five Reasons Your Prospecting SucksReaching your sales goals starts with great prospecting. But too many people don’t prospect effectively. If you don’t have a full pipeline of qualified buyers, odds are you’re making one or more of these fatal mistakes.

1. Not spending enough time on it
I know, I know—you’ve got 18,000 things to do every day. But really, how many of them are more important than prospecting? What can you delegate, outsource, or stop doing completely in order to free up more time for prospecting?

2. Going after the wrong prospects
Typically when I ask a salesperson, professional, or business owner who their market is, the response is “everyone.” That’s the wrong answer! Because you can’t possibly sell to everyone. If you want to make the most of your prospecting efforts, you need to focus on your ideal prospects—the ones who most need and appreciate your product or service. And not just have a need, but also have a budget to afford it, the authority to make a decision, and the motivation to act.

3. Using the wrong tools and approaches
If you’re targeting CEOs, Facebook and Twitter are the wrong places to find them. And conversely, if you’re going after consumers, LinkedIn is the wrong place to spend your time and energy. Where does your ideal prospect spend their time? Where do they go, what do they read, who do they talk with?

4. You don’t really believe in what you sell
For a brief (very brief) time in my youth, I was an appointment setter for a company that sold replacement windows. I hated that job. And the single biggest reason is that I didn’t care about—and thus didn’t truly believe in—the product. If you don’t fully, completely, totally believe in whatever it is you’re selling, do yourself—and everyone else—a favor and quit. And go sell something you can truly believe in. Because enthusiasm and passion matter—not just in prospecting, but in every element of the sales process.

5. Bothering people rather than delivering value
If your ideal prospects aren’t responding to your outreach efforts, there’s a good chance it’s because they perceive you as an annoyance. If all of your messages boil down to “Give me some of your money!” then there’s no reason for your prospects to engage with you. How can you be of value to your potential buyers? How can you serve them in a way that builds trust and appreciation, thus making them want to do business with you?

Before you can close more deals, you need more prospects. How many of these mistakes are you currently making? And what can you do about them? Correct these problems and you’ll not only meet your sales goals, you’ll exceed them.